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Can I go to the dentist pregnant?

Yes, please do it! Just because a person is pregnant does not mean that they are sick, quite the opposite, a miracle is taking place inside their body, new life is being formed! Pregnant women should take special care, avoid doing certain activities, in some cases take medications to help in the pregnancy process, but that does not mean that they should neglect their own health, on the contrary, the healthier the mother, the more the baby healthy.


During pregnancy it is important to visit the dentist, you should always let us know when you are pregnant, how many months you are and even let us know if you suspect you are, let us know what medications you are taking and if the pregnancy is, for any reason, high risk. There are many oral conditions that are associated with pregnancy, such as pregnancy gingivitis, or even the appearance of dental cavities (pregnancy does not cause them as many people believe, the reasons will be explained later).


How does pregnancy affect the mother's oral health?

Pregnancy gingivitis: The hormonal changes that women experience during pregnancy can cause gum inflammation, redness, and even bleeding during brushing or flossing. This occurs most often in the second trimester of pregnancy. Although it is an uncomfortable situation, and in some cases painful in the most affected areas, it is important to maintain oral hygiene and attend dental cleaning appointments; Your dentist will probably recommend that it be done more frequently than normal, perhaps every 3 or 4 months instead of every 6. It is extremely important to treat this problem, since, if it is not managed carefully and at the right times, It can lead to more serious complications that are difficult to treat.


Cavities during pregnancy: It is very common to find in consultation patients who report having had perfect oral health and that during pregnancy they began to have cavities, or who never had cavities until pregnancy, there are even cases of pregnant women without previous restorations who come to consultation presenting a large number of active carious lesions. The myth is often heard that “the teeth are decalcified so that the baby can form”, yes, that is heard in dental offices and clinics around the world more frequently than you imagine, and obviously, that is not true.


The reality is that yes, during pregnancy an increase in the number of cavities is normal, but this is due to other causes, for example, nausea, vomiting and reflux, common especially in the first trimester, make saliva more acidic. , which weakens the enamel and makes it more prone to tooth decay. In addition to the fact that many women report an increase in carbohydrate consumption, gum inflammation can cause pain when brushing, so hygiene habits can be diminished and even fatigue can cause the frequency of brushing to decrease. All of these variables, whether one, two or all, are in fact causing the increase in the appearance of dental cavities. For this reason, it is also recommended to visit the dentist during pregnancy, to treat all these issues in time, and answer possible questions. that each patient may have.


Medications during pregnancy: Both the obstetrician who carries out the pregnancy and the dentist are attentive to the health of both the mother and the baby. It is extremely important to inform the dentist what medications the obstetrician-gynecologist prescribed, what medications he prohibited from using during pregnancy, and obviously communication between the doctor and the dentist is essential if it is necessary to prescribe any pain medication or antibiotic, which are medications approved by the doctor.



Dental anesthesia during pregnancy: Numerous studies have been carried out for decades to determine whether or not there are risks in the use of local anesthetics to perform dental treatments in pregnant women, whether for the removal of cavities, root canal treatments, even extractions, and so far no studies have produced results showing dangers to the mother or baby. In a study published in August 2015 in the Journal of the American Dental Association in the United States, led by Dr. Hagai, he evaluated a large group of pregnant women, to whom dental treatments using local anesthetics such as lidocaine, articaine, among others, and another group where local anesthetics were not used.


In the results of this study, there were no problems in either the mothers or the babies in either group. Although it is recommended to avoid the use of local anesthetics with vasoconstrictors, no study carried out so far demonstrates any complications associated with anesthetics. dental during pregnancy. “Our study did not identify any evidence that dental anesthetics are harmful during pregnancy,” says Dr. Hagai in his study, as well, “We aimed the study to determine if there were any significant risks associated with dental treatments in pregnant women and babies during birth, using local anesthetics in the treatments, we did not find any risk.” The study also showed that there was no difference between the two groups in cases of miscarriages, birth defects, differences in birth weight of babies or premature births.


Dental x-rays during pregnancy: In general, dental x-rays emit too little radiation to affect the mother or baby, however, they should be avoided if possible. If they are essential for the required treatment, a lead apron or apron will be placed over the patient (pregnant or not), covering the thorax, abdomen, and even the neck to protect the thyroid gland. There are no studies that show harm to mothers or their babies from the use of X-rays during dental treatments.


Dental anesthesia during pregnancy

Numerous studies have been carried out for decades to determine whether or not there are risks in the use of local anesthetics for dental treatments in pregnant women, whether for cavity removal, root canal treatments, even extractions, and until now no study has produced results that demonstrate dangers for the mother or baby. In a study published in August 2015 in the Journal of the American Dental Association in the United States, led by Dr. Hagai, he evaluated a large group of pregnant women, to whom dental treatments using local anesthetics such as lidocaine, articaine, among others, and another group where local anesthetics were not used.


In the results of this study, there were no problems in either the mothers or the babies in either group. Although it is recommended to avoid the use of local anesthetics with vasoconstrictors, no study carried out so far demonstrates any complications associated with anesthetics. dental during pregnancy. “Our study did not identify any evidence that dental anesthetics are harmful during pregnancy,” says Dr. Hagai in his study, as well, “We aimed the study to determine if there were any significant risks associated with dental treatments in pregnant women and babies during birth, using local anesthetics in the treatments, we did not find any risk.” The study also showed that there was no difference between the two groups in cases of miscarriages, birth defects, differences in birth weight of babies or premature births.



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